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 1.0 Introduction: The Roku Channel Developer Program

Roku is offering content owners and publishers the ability to create their own channels on the Roku player and to make those channels available to Roku users. The Roku SDK documentation contains the necessary information for creating a Roku channel, including design tools and sample applications. The terms of use of the Roku SDK are contained within the Roku Channel Developer Agreement. After creating a channel application, content owners and publishers may upload the application to the Roku Developer Site for distribution to Roku users. There are two methods for distributing Roku channels through the Roku Developer Site after they have been uploaded:

The Roku Channel Store

Roku Public Channels
Public Channels created for the Channel Store should be those intended for the widest possible distribution, without restriction other than as required for business reasons, such as payment of a monthly subscription.
Public channels channels may be submitted to Roku for acceptance into the Chanel Store. If accepted by Roku, a channel will be made available through the Channel Store to all Roku users.

Roku Private Channels
A channel may be uploaded to the Roku Developer Site and made available to users through the Private Channel mechanism. These channels are not available through the Channel Store, but can be accessed by Roku users by means of a unique channel access code provided to users. Channels intended for a very narrow audience, or carrying restrictions on access such as membership in a group or organization are better suited for Private Channels. There is no Roku approval process necessary to publish a Private Channel.

1.1 Welcome to the Roku Streaming Player Developer Guide

This Developer Guide is designed to help you quickly come up to speed on the Roku platform architecture, Channel Store, and the basics of how to develop and deploy an application to the box in development mode and to the Channel Store as a published application to end users. Note: In this documentation we refer to the development of new channels on the Roku player as "applications" since they consist of a set of scripts and related assets. Channels can access video streams, music, photos, or perform other functions enabled by the SDK.

1.2 Developing with the Roku SDK

The Roku SDK consists of a set of documentation, design guidelines, and sample applications that enable channels to be developed for the Roku Streaming Player. To understand the Roku SDK, here are the key documents:

  • The Developer Guide (DeveloperGuide.pdf) covers the architecture, programming language, development process, and channel deployment requirements.
  • The BrightScript Reference Manual will bring you up to speed on the language and serves as a reference for the core components. BrightScript is the programming language used to develop channel applications on the Roku Streaming Player. BrightScript is a scripting language optimized to be the high level glue that ties together BrightScript Components and the Internet.
  • The Component Reference guide describes the Roku Streaming Player platform components that expose APIs to BrightScript.


The entire documentation set includes the following:

In addition to the documentation, the SDK includes a set of sample apps that demonstrate some of the BrightScript and Roku Platform programming techniques. You may reuse any of the code found in these sample apps as a basis for your own development, subject to the terms of the Roku Channel Developer Agreement. A brief description of these sample apps follows:

  • Simpleposter Very simple poster screen with a filter banner
  • Simplevideoplayer Use the roVideoScreen component to play video with SRT subtitles subtitles. Modify the app to quickly test your media.
  • Videoplayer Complete Video Channel using category based XML feeds 
  • Audioapp Use the roAudioPlayer component to play audio
  • Monitorsetup Example use of the roSlideShow component
  • Deviantart Example use of the roSlideShow component and XML feeds
  • Register Rendezvous style registration and account linking
  • TwitterOAuth Use the roImageCanvas to display tweets. OAuth implementation uses roUrlTranfer and roHMAC
  • Clock Screensaver uses RunScreenSaver() and RunScreenSaverSettings() entry points. The roImageCanvas uses rotations.
  • Paragraph Display images on the roParagraphScreen
  • CustomVideoPlayer Use roVideoPlayer to play HLS stream in an roImageCanvas window. roFontRegistry example.
  • Filebrowser Simple roFilesystem and roRegEx example.
  • USBPlayer Play media files form USB drive. USB, roFileSystem, roRegEx example.
  • SimpleGrid A barebones grid screen example.
  • UsbGrid Use the grid screen to browse a USB filesystem.
  • SimpleInfo  Example of using the Info Button to popup contextual information
  • Simple2D A simple bouncing ball implementation of using the 2D graphics system and the roScreen component.
  • 2D Test Sample 2D graphics tests.
  • Metadata  Show getting EXIF metadata from images and tag information in audio files. Example of roImageMetaData and roAudioMetaData
  • launchparams Example of channel that accepts parameters from ECP. Useful for channels that respond to remote apps and clickable ads.
  • Scroll  Scroll a large image on the viewable screen
  • Snake A Sample 2D Graphics Game.
  • Simple2d  Example of using the roScreen component.
  • Socket_tests  Simple example of using roStreamSocket and roDataGramSocket
  • Web_server Example of using roStreamSocket
  • SimpleInChannelPurchase Example of using the channel store purchase APIs
  • Ecp_client Java examples utilizing the ECP protocol to control the Roku. There is a simple Roku_Finder that uses SSDP to detect Roku boxes on the network and android_remote that is a simple remote control application that will run on the Android platform.

1.3 What Do I Need to Get Started?

Here's a list of the things you'll need to get started writing applications for the Roku Streaming Player:

  1. Roku Streaming Player with Software Release 2.7 or later
  2. Roku SDK (Development Kit Documentation and Sample Applications)
  3. Development Workstation with Text Editor and Terminal Application
  4. Standard Web Browser (Firefox, Internet Explorer or equivalent)

1.4 Roku Models and Features

With the release of the Roku 2 platform, Roku's product line has expanded to the point that there are significant capability differences between many of the models. While all the models have the same basic streaming video playback support, the hardware internals of the models will support different levels of game play. There is even a new SDK method, (roVideoScreen or roVideoPlayer).SetMaxVideoDecodeResolution() , that only has an effect on units with an OpenGL implementation. Please see the Component Reference for more details on this method.
The Roku models ship with incompatible power supplies as specified in the table below. If the wrong power supply is used, there is a risk of bricking the Roku unit when the power current of the supply is greater than what is specified for your Roku unit. On the other hand, if the power supply current is less than the Roku's specified power current, you run the risk of spontaneous reboots when the Roku cannot draw enough current.
When publishing your channel, you will have the opportunity to specify hardware requirements like "USB", "Roku 2", or "Bluetooth Game Remote". The table below should help you in determining the target models for you channel.

Current Models

 

Roku LT*

Roku 2 HD

Roku 2 XD

Roku 2 XS

Roku 3Roku LTRoku 1Roku 2

roDeviceInfo.GetModel()

"2400X"
"2450X"

"3000X"

"3050X"

"3100X"

"4200X""2700X""2710X""2720X"

Power Supply

5 V, 2.5 A

5V, 2.5 A

5 V, 2.5 A

5 V, 2.5 A

12 V, 1 A   

CPU

MIPS 400 MHz

ARM 600 MHz

ARM 600 MHz

ARM 600 MHz

ARM dual coreMIPS 600 MHzMIPS 600 MHzMIPS 600 MHz

Accelerated Graphics API**

None

OpenGL ES 2.0

OpenGL ES 2.0

OpenGL ES 2.0

OpenGL ES 2.0NoneNoneNone

RAM

256 MB

256 MB

256 MB

256 MB

512 MB512 MB512 MB512 MB

Non-volatile Memory (Flash) Storage

256 MB

256 MB

256 MB

256 MB

256 MB256 MB256 MB256 MB

Composite Video Out

yesyesyesyesnoyesyesyes

HDMI 720p Video Out

yesyesyesyesyesyesyesyes

HDMI 1080p Video Out

no

no

yesyesyesnoyesyes

Wi-Fi (b/g/n)

yesyesyesyesyesyesyesyes

Wi-Fi (n 2x2)

 

 

  yes   

Ethernet Port

no

no

no

yesyesnonono

USB 2.0

no

no

no

yesyesnonono

Supports Games < 750K

    yes   

Supports Games > 750K

 

   yes   

microSD Slot

no

yesyesyesyesnonono

Bluetooth Game Remote

no

yesyesyesnononono

Wi-Fi Direct Game Remote

no

no

no

noyes  yes

 

  • Roku LT "2400X" started with the same ARM chip as Roku 2 models, but transitioned to the MIPS chip with model "2450X"
  • The OpenGL ES 2.0 API is currently only available under NDA to selected premium development partners. Roku desires to more openly share these low level APIs. We are hard at work tackling the security issues with this sharing that will simultaneously give content owners good reason to trust the uncompromising security of the box.
  • Bluetooth Game Remote supports motion control and the instant replay button. The IR remote does not. The APIs for the motion control are only available under NDA at this time.


Classic Models

 

Roku SD

Roku HD
Classsic

Roku XD

Roku XD|S
Classic

Roku XD|SRoku HD

roDeviceInfo.GetModel()

"N1050"

"N1000"
"N1100"

"2050X"
"2050N"

"N1101"

"2100X"
"2100N"
"2000C"

Power Supply

5 V, 1 A

5 V, 1 A

5 V, 1 A

5 V, 2.5 A

5 V, 2.5 A5 V, 2.5 A

CPU

MIPS 400 MHz

MIPS 400 MHz

MIPS 400 MHz

MIPS 400 MHz

MIPS 400 MHz

MIPS 400 MHz

Accelerated Graphics API

None

None

None

None

NoneNone

RAM

256 MB

256 MB

256 MB

256 MB

256 MB256 MB

Non-volatile Memory (Flash) Storage

64 MB

64 MB

64 MB

256 MB

256 MB256 MB

Composite Video Out

yesyesyesyesyesyes

HDMI 720p Video Out

no

yes

yesyesyesyes

HDMI 1080p Video Out

no

no

yesyesyesno

Wi-Fi (b/g/n)

yesyesyesyesyesyes

Wi-Fi (n 2x2)

 

 

    

Ethernet Port

yesyesyesyesyesyes

USB 2.0

no

no

no

yesyesno

Supports Games < 750K

      

Supports Games > 750K

 

 

 

   

 

2.0 Development Environment Overview

2.1 Architectural Overview

Diagram: Architecture Block Diagram

The diagram above provides a high-level overview of the main system components for the Roku Streaming Player platform. Developer applications are written using the BrightScript programming language. These applications are designed to be standalone entities that can be deployed to a running system with minimal impact.
BrightScript applications are dynamically loaded at runtime and run within a unique context within the BrightScript virtual machine. They are "sand-boxed" and run protected from other areas of the system. Scripts only have access to platform resources that are exposed to the scripting layer as BrightScript components. Developers have a wide selection of built-in elements from the BrightScript programming language, plus additional platform components to build their applications. See the BrightScript Reference and the Component Reference for additional information.

2.2 User Interface Elements / Object Model

The Roku SDK uses the BrightScript programming language for development and exposes a set of interfaces to platform services through BrightScript Components. These platform SDK services include capabilities such as networking, video playback, user interface, and data management.
The objects in the Roku SDK are divided into two primary areas:

 

  • Core Objects – Fundamental objects that exist on all Roku platforms and are device independent
  • Platform Objects – Objects unique to a specific platform, such as the Roku Streaming Player


Developing an application for the Roku Streaming Player consists of writing a BrightScript application, packaging the application and associated resource files and deploying it to the platform. During development packaging consists of a structured zip file. For final deployment, tools are provided to create a signed and encrypted application package. At runtime, the player will enumerate the installed applications and display them on the main menu. When the user selects the application, the script(s) are loaded and control is passed to your application. When the user exits, the script is halted and control is returned to the user interface "shell".
User interface functionality available in the SDK includes:

  • Top-Level Menu (Launch screen for applications with logo art)
  • Poster Screen (Horizontally scrolling list of shows with poster art)
  • Springboard (Detail screen with options for displaying individual shows)
  • Video Player Screen (Video playback support with progress bar and trick mode support)
  • PIN Entry Screen (User entry of PIN for purchase/rental verification)
  • Message/Error Dialog (Dialog for display of errors and other user messages)
  • Filter Widget (Selection widget for filtering content display by type)
  • Rendezvous/Code Registration Screen (Display/validate registration codes)
  • Username/Password Registration Screen
  • Text Screen ( Display formatted text to the user and allow selection of options)
  • Search Screen (Keyword based search with progressive disclosure of results)


Detailed information on all these screens can be found in the Component Reference Manual.

2.3 Display Modes (HD/SD)

The user interface has been designed to support both High Definition (HD) and Standard Definition (SD) displays. By default the streaming player starts in SD mode, but allows the user the option to specify their display preferences. Display preferences are handled globally for all applications by selecting the "display type" option in "settings".
There are three possible modes:

  • 4:3 standard-definition (480i/p)
  • 16:9 anamorphic widescreen (480i/p)
  • HDTV (720p)


The SDK UI objects are SD/HD aware and will automatically display in the correct mode. In some cases, the HD mode will allow the user to see more data on the screen. The SD UI is rendered natively at 480p and the HD UI at 720p. As a developer, no special programming is required to support these display modes. Any artwork used by the application (movie posters, logos, etc.) should be provided in both HD and SD versions and included with the application or downloaded dynamically at runtime. The screen objects will attempt to scale improperly sized artwork, but this could result in a loss of quality or degrade performance. It is strongly recommended that developers provide original artwork in both resolutions.

2.4 Top-Level Menu

The top-level menu provides a launch point for all applications. Applications must provide HD and SD versions of the application icon artwork for display on the top-level menu. When an application is selected from the top-level menu, the application is loaded and control is transferred to the application. The user may return to the top level at any time by pressing the Home button. Pressing the Home button will always exit the application and unconditionally return control back to the UI application shell.

2.5 User Interaction / Events

Roku SDK UI objects provide an event oriented model for user interaction. Instead of receiving and directly handling all of the IR events received by the application, the UI elements will handle all navigation commands directly and send higher level events to the script as the focus changes or the user makes a selection. Scrolling, trick modes and screen-to-screen navigation is handled by the SDK UI objects and the script generally only needs to interact when there is a change in context or the user highlights or selects new data elements. Refer to the Event Loops section or the Class Interface sections for additional information.

2.6 Customization

The objects in the user interface framework expose a set of screen types which standardize user interaction and make it easy for developers to quickly write and deploy applications. Screen types enforce a user interaction model and ensure consistency between applications. They may be customized to provide a unique, developer specific look-and-feel. Customization is currently focused on "re-skinning" the application and supports the following types of changes:

  • Add an application specific image to the top-level menu
  • Change the text to be displayed on the main menu to identify the application
  • Change the application logo to be displayed in the header area for the screen
  • Change the artwork used on the "overhang" or header area for the screen
  • Change the background color for the screen
  • Change the colors used for font rendering on text, buttons, and screens


Within the application the developer is free to combine the available screen types and controls as needed to implement their application. The hierarchy of screens is unique for an application and depends on the user experience desired. Some applications may be fairly "flat" while others may have a deeper hierarchy.

 3.0 Video Streaming

3.1 Supported Video Formats

The following is a summary of supported video formats that have been tested and/or are currently in-use. Other formats or encodings may be supported, but should be evaluated on a case by case basis.

 

H.264 SD

H.264 HD

Aspect Ratio1

4:3

16:9

Dimension

Various to 720x480

Various to 1280x720 and
1920x1080 for 1080p

Progressive/Interlaced

Progressive

Progressive

File Format

.mp4 (MPEG-4 Pt 14), .mov .m4v
HLS: m3u8 & .ts

.mp4 (MPEG-4 Pt 14), .mov .m4v
HLS: m3u8 & .ts

Frame Rate2

23.976 fps or 29.97 fps

23.976 fps or 29.97 fps

Color Space

YUV

YUV

Video Codec

H.264/AVC

H.264/AVC

Profile

Main/High

High

Level/Complexity

4.1

4.1

Video Mode

Constrained VBR

Constrained VBR

Average Streaming Video Bitrate3

384Kbps - 1.6Mbps

1.6Mbps – 3.2Mbps

Average USB Video Bitrate3

384Kbps – 8.0Mbps

384Kbps – 8.0Mbps

Peak Video Bitrate

1.5x average

1.5x average

Key Frame Interval

< 10s

< 10s

DRM

None

None

Audio Codec

AAC LC (CBR),
AC3 Passthrough

AAC LC (CBR),
AC3 Passthrough

Audio Bit Rate

128-256Kbps

32-256Kbps

Audio Sample Rate

44.1 Khz or 48Khz

44.1 Khz or 48 Khz

Audio Sample Size

16-Bit

16-Bit

Audio Channels

2-Ch Stereo

2-Ch Stereo


Notes:

    1. The dimensions vary on a title-by-title basis depending on the source material and the target aspect ratio for the encoding (e.g. 4:3 or 16:9).  Content should always be encoded at full width and the height is adjusted.  For example, a 1.66 aspect ratio source is encoded as a 720x432 video and displayed as letterboxed for a 4:3 display.
    2. The frame rate used for encoding depends on the source material. Film content is generally 23.976 fps, while video content is generally at 29.97.
    3. For typical streaming video applications, we recommend a range of ~384Kbps to ~3.8Mbps. For USB playback, we recommend that you stay under 8.0 Mbps. This provides a good balance between quality and support for a wide number of users. In some cases lower and higher bitrates have been used, but this frequently results in poor quality or limits the % of the installed base that can view this encoding.

3.2 Supported Image Formats

The following image formats are currently tested and in-use. Other formats or encodings may be supported, but should be evaluated on a case by case basis. The use of .png is recommended for UI graphics due to the use of alpha channel within the UI.

  • JPG, JPEG
  • PNG
  • GIF

3.3 Trick Mode Support

Two types of trick mode support (FF/REW/SEEK) are provided. For developers who generate and publish image archives in Roku's BIF (Base Index Frame) file format, scene based trick-mode using index frames will be supported. A specification is available which details the BIF file format and data required. If this data is published and available for a given title, scene based trick-modes will be available. The content meta-data indicates the availability of this data on a per title basis by providing URL's for the HD and SD versions of these assets.
In cases where the BIF file is either not supported or unavailable, the system will present a time-based method of supporting trick modes. The user will be presented with a progress bar showing their location in the show and be allowed to seek using the normal trick play controls. Since scene information is not available, the user will only have a visual timeline and numeric time information to locate their desired position in the movie. Once the new location is selected, the system will buffer a minimal amount of stream data and begin playback.

4.0 Guided Setup and Registration

4.1 Guided Setup

Guided Setup is done only during the initial setup process or when the device has been reset to factory defaults. This process is designed to be developer independent and is performed one time. If reconfiguration of these attributes is needed, it can be done through the Settings option on the main menu. Guided Setup configures basic network services (wired or wireless) and performs a series of tests to ensure the device can communicate properly.
Guided Setup then takes the user through a rendezvous style registration process to link the Roku device to an account on roku.com. An account defines a unique channel line-up for a user based on the channels they have selected. All devices linked to a specific account will receive the same channel line-up.

4.2 Registration

Developer applications may also wish to present a customized view to their individual users. The standard way to support this on the Roku Streaming Player is to provide a registration process that associates the device with a user-specific account on the developer's site. Each developer needing account registration will be required to implement a registration UI as part of their application. This UI may be called in one of two ways:

  1. On first use of any service, the system may detect that a service has not yet been configured and guide the user through the registration process for that developer. This method makes it easy for new services to be added to the device over time and presents a one-time configuration step on first use. The Netflix channel is a good example of this type of registration
  2. On first use of an account specific feature, the user may be prompted to register their device and obtain access to these enhanced feature(s). An example of this approach would be a service that may be used without an account to provide a base level of functionality, but that requires account linking for advanced features such as personalization, favorites or other similar features. The Amazon channel is a good example of this type of registration. You can see it when entering "Your Video Library". Flickr also uses this approach and that source is available in the SDK examples.


The process of registration involves linking a device (identified by a unique electronic serial number) with an account on a specific service. Account registration and device linking can be accomplished in two ways. The preferred method is through the implementation of a code-based "rendezvous" style registration system. An alternative username/password style of registration may also be used.
A rendezvous registration system presents the user with a simple on-screen code on the device during registration. The end user enters this code on the developer's website to establish a link between the device and the users account. This type of registration requires the third-party developer to implement the following features:

  • A web services API for obtaining a registration code and specifying retry parameters
  • A web services API for obtaining the registration result and associated user token
  • Web pages to register/un-register a device on the developer's site


A username/password registration scheme may be desirable for some services. In these cases, the user will enter the username and password for their account during setup. This info will be used in subsequent calls to the third-party service to obtain the necessary credentials to make web services requests. This method is provided solely for compatibility with a variety of services. The rendezvous style registration is preferred both for its usability as well as the security benefits.
Any user account information or tokens exchanged during the registration process may be stored in the application specific portion of the registry as persistent data. This data may be accessed again at any time by the application when making web services calls to the developer's back-end service.
It is important not to keep any permanent device association stored on your server. Roku wants to give users the ability to do a "Factory Reset" and have any personally identifiable information wiped from the device. This includes removing any association with server side accounts. Account tokens stored in the device registry meet this requirement nicely as the device registry is removed with a "Factory Reset".
Details and a walkthrough of implementing device/account linking and registration can be found in the Device Linking and Registration Guide.

5.0 Security Overview

5.1 System Security

The Roku Streaming Player is designed to play a variety of streaming content directly from the Internet. We understand that this content is valuable to the content owners and must be protected from unauthorized access to prevent both casual and professional copying and distribution. Multiple types of security provisions are available if needed.
The system has been designed to be hardened against unauthorized attack. This process starts at the Roku factory as each system is individualized and uniquely keyed as a foundation for robust security. The platform supports a secure key store and hardware encryption engine. The core set of system software has been encrypted and is protected by a secure boot process and the use of signed binaries.
SSL is the primary method provided for developers to implement content and/or communications security for their application. The device supports both client and server authentication via SSL to provide a secure communications channel between trusted end-points.

5.2 Application Security

Applications which run on the player must be encrypted and signed using the developer's unique developer specific set of keys generated by the Roku Streaming Player in developer mode. Code signing is done automatically as part of generating a package and ensures the integrity of code. Application packages are also encrypted to ensure confidentiality of the source code. Packaging tools are available on the Developer web page of Roku Streaming Players. By default, the developer page is not enabled. You must enter the remote code Home 3x, Up 2x, Right, Left, Right, Left, Right to enable it. A walkthrough of the packaging process is detailed later in this document.
The packaging process is designed to be lightweight and focuses on ensuring that an application originates from a known source and is protected against tampering. It is the responsibility of the developer to ensure that the application is properly tested, high quality, and provides a good user experience.

5.3 Protected Environment

BrightScript applications are run within a unique context in the BrightScript Virtual Machine. Applications are "sand-boxed" and run protected from other areas of the system. Scripts have limited access to platform resources and can only access functionality specifically exposed through the scripting layer as BrightScript components. This ensures the overall integrity of the platform and prevents unauthorized access to the Operating System or any 3rd Party content. Applications are restricted from interacting with other applications on the system or accessing their private data. Applications store their data separately and securely in a unique area of the system registry. Suites of applications can share registry data by creating each application's package with the same developer id set of keys.

6.0 Development Overview

6.1 Development and Deployment Process Overview

New applications or channels are written using the BrightScript programming language. BrightScript exposes platform functionality through BrightScript Components, which may be used by developers to create their application. These applications are designed to be standalone entities that can be deployed to a running system with minimal impact, no major software upgrades, and no downtime.
Applications consist of a set of BrightScript program files (text), resources such as images (jpeg, png) and optionally, data unique to a specific application. Since BrightScript files are text, developers can use their Text Editor or IDE of choice for writing code. When the application is ready to be tested, web and command line based tools are available to make the process of packaging the application and deploying it to a development system fast and easy. Development builds are designed to be deployed to individual or small groups of systems where the developer has physical access. Wider deployment for beta and/or production releases can utilize the Roku developer website to upload channels for private or public access.
A walkthrough of installing to a local development enabled Roku Streaming Player can be found later in this document. A walkthrough of packaging your application and deploying privately to users who know your channel code or publicly to all users via publishing in the Channel Store is available in the Channel Packaging and Publishing Guide. Details on developing with Roku Components and the API's available can be found in the Roku Streaming Player Component Reference.

7.0 Loading and Running your Application Walkthrough

7.1 Enabling Development Mode on your box

Before you are able to load a development application to your box, you must enable development mode on your Roku Streaming Player. When you enter the special remote control sequence:
Home 3x, Up 2x, Right, Left, Right, Left, Right
You will be presented with the Developer Settings page where you can enable developer mode on the box. When developer mode is enabled, you can access the Application Installer page as specified in the next section.
If you would like to subsequently disable development mode on your box, simply enter the special remote code sequence again and select the "disable installer" option on screen.

7.2 Application Installer Page

Development applications are loaded onto the device using a standard web browser. When enabled for development mode the device hosts a web page for installing your application. To access the installer page, do the following:

  1. From your Roku Streaming Player, navigate to "Roku Player Settings", "player info" to find the IP address of your box.
  2. From your development workstation, open a standard web browser and type the following URL:
    1. http://<rokuPlayer-ip-address> for example: http://192.168.1.100
  3. You should see a page like the one displayed in Figure 1 (Application Install Page) below.
  4. Click the "Browse" button and navigate to the location of the application zip file on your development machine as shown in Figure 2 (Application File Browser). The full path to the application .zip file should appear in the text field.
  5. Finally, click the "Install" button to deploy the application to the box. The application should install and begin running immediately. You will see a message on the web page indicating it was successfully loaded as shown in Figure 3 (Application Installer page – Installation Complete)
  6. Run the application with the application debug console open. When you telnet to the Roku Streaming Player on port 8085 (see section 8.1) you will see the debug console from your application. If there are any errors in your code, they will show up on this console. There is even a debugger attached to this port that will give you source file and line number information for script errors.



The Application Installer page only accepts applications using the zip file format. This process is often referred to as "side-loading" your application. It does not allow installation of signed (.pkg) applications package files. The .pkg file must be distributed through the channel store mechanism as either a published or private application.
The following image shows the Development Application Installer web page. At this point, there is no developer application on the device. If an application were present, it would be shown as installed when the page is initially opened. The application will continue to persist on the device until you delete it by using the "Delete" button shown below.


Figure 1: Application Installer Page


The following image shows the standard windows file browser. Your development environment may be on Windows, Linux or Mac, since all you need are text editing tools, a web browser and the ability to generate .zip files containing your application. Select your application zip file and you are ready to install.


Figure 2: Application File Browser


The following image shows the Development Application Installer web page after you've successfully installed your application. If you attempt to reinstall an identical version of an application that is already installed on the box, you will receive an error. You can always delete and re-install any application at any time.
Applications are limited to a maximum of 2MB in size, due the the limited amount of flash storage available. In general, since these are internet enabled applications, they tend to be much smaller and are typically < 300KB in size. Most of the space is consumed by artwork and the code size is minimal. If you find that your application is too large to install, look at removing some of the artwork from your application package and placing it on the web where it is easier to modify and it can be downloaded dynamically at runtime.


 

Figure 3: Application Installer Page (Installation Complete)

 

7.3 Using the Makefile to "Side-Load" the channel

The SDK examples include Makefiles that can automate the steps needed to install the channel. The Makefiles use the ROKU_DEV_TARGET environment variable to know the ip address of the Roku box to install on. Instead of following the steps in 7.2, you could use the Makefile from a shell like so:
% export ROKU_DEV_TARGET=192.168.1.140
% cd <sdk>/examples/source/videoplayer
% make install

 

7.4 Sample "Hello World" Program

Now that you've installed some of the SDK examples, try building your own program from scratch.
% mkdir helloworld
% cd helloworld
% mkdir source
In your favorite editor create a file name 'manifest' in the helloworld directory that contains the following content:
title=Hello World
subtitle=Simplest Program
major_version=1
Now, create a helloworld.brs file in the hellowold/source directory that contains the following content:

' *********************************************************
' ** Roku Hello World Example
' *********************************************************
Sub Main()
port = CreateObject("roMessagePort")
screen = CreateObject("roParagraphScreen")
screen.SetMessagePort(port)
screen.SetTitle("Example")
screen.AddParagraph("Hello World!")
screen.Show()
wait(0, screen.GetMessagePort())
End Sub
% zip -9 –r ../helloworld.zip .

Now, you can follow the instructions section 7.2 to install helloworld.zip as a development applications on the Roku.

 

8.0 Debugging your Application

8.1 Accessing the Debug Console

Using a standard shell program and a telnet client application, you can connect to the console for your application. The console provides you a window into the runtime environment for your application. By default, all console output from your application goes to the shell. You can learn a lot about your application just from the debug output. To access the console for your application:

  1. Open up a terminal shell application
    1. Command.com or other terminal on Windows (All Programs -> Accessories -> Command Prompt)
    2. Gnome or other terminal on Linux
    3. Terminal on Mac
  2. Type the command:
    1. telnet <rokuPlayer-ip-address> 8085 e.g. telnet 192.168.1.100 8085
  3. You should see the contents of the current application output buffer. Make sure your application is running, because you must run a development app to see output in this console. The console will not allow access to the output of other applications on the system. It will only allow debug access to your development application.


 

Figure 4: Connecting to the application debug console

8.2 Script Output

The console shows you the output of your script during run time. If your application crashes, the debugger will display the line number of the error, as well as the contents of various variables at the time of the crash. If there is a syntax error in your code it will also be described here. You should have the developer console open whenever you install a new application to catch any startup errors.

8.3 The debugger

In addition to displaying console output, the shell can also be used as an interactive debugger. When your application is running, simply press CTRL-C to break the application and enter debug mode. You will see the BrightScript Debugger prompt where you can type in commands. You can also force your application to break at a specific location by placing the "stop" command anywhere in your script.
You can resume you application again by typing "c" or "cont". For a full list of options, type "help" in the debugger. You'll see options for inspecting variables, stepping through your code and looking at the backtrace of the current call stack.


Figure 5: A sample debug session

8.4 Enabling tcpdump on your box

In today's world of switched hubs that lack a promiscuous mode, having tcpdump on the Roku box will allow you to more easily get a packet trace to aid debugging.
To enable tcpdump packet traces on the Roku box, enter the remote code:
Home 5x, FF 3x, Rewind 2x
This brings you to a "secret" screen, where you can select:
"enable debug logging"
tcpdump is now enabled on the box. It creates a circular log of packet traces that can be accessed at http://<rokuPlayer-ipaddress>/pkgs/ in log0,log1,log2,log3 that can be filled circularly.
Once the log is downloaded to your host, you can view it in your favorite tcpdump viewer. A popular viewer is available at http://www.wireshark.org/

Figure 6: Application Console Output

 

9.0 Top Development Tips for the Roku Platform

  • Make sure you capture all of the events sent by the roVideoScreen or you may miss important playability information.
  • Know the Remote Control Codes for special screens:
    • Dump Core: Home 5x, Up, Rew 2x, FF 2x
    • Debug Info on screen: Home 5x, Rew 3x, FF 2x
    • Channel Version Info: Home 3x, Up 2x, Left, Right, Left, Right, Left
    • Developer Settings Page: Home 3x, Up 2x, Right, Left, Right, Left, Right
  • The Developer Settings Page is necessary for enabling developer mode on your box.
  • All file paths are prefixed by the device (currently pkg or tmp) and using the naming convention: pkg:/filename.txt. Even file URLs must use this convention: file://pkg:/filename.txt.
  • Always use a screen facade object when launching your application so that it appears to the user that your channel launches immediately and avoids screen flicker when exiting. (See the simplevideoplayer sample application for a commented implementation of the technique)
  • You can use the theme attributes of roApplicationManager (see Component Reference) to create a new UI skin for your channel.
  • When using rendezvous style registration and account linking, be sure to store the linking information in the device registry and not on your servers. We require that users are able to do a "Factory Reset" and be confident that no personally identifiable information is associated with the device. This is not possible if you have saved permanent serial number information on your servers.
  • We are limited in the types of video content supported on the device. We currently support .mp4, .mov, and .m4v files with H.264/AAC encoding as well as unencrypted WMV and HTTP Live Streaming.
  • We only support .wma and .mp3 audio files in the audio player.
  • Be sure to use a unique key for each application you publish and reuse this key each time you update your application using the "rekey" option. This ensures that all versions of your application will have access to the same registry data and avoid causing users to re-link after an update.
  • When using the slide show component, sometimes a high resolution image may take a while to download. A good trick to provide quick feedback to the user is to put an image in your package (so it's not downloading) that may have your logo, etc… but informs the user that the slideshow is playing it's just "Retrieving…". This slide could be the first slide in your slideshow so that feedback to the user is instant and the slideshow never appears "hung".
  • We require that your web servers support range requests. If they do not, you may run into content that is not playable, or large images that do not display. The data will appear as a corrupted file format to our components, as the first block may be resent by the web server when we expect data at a particular range or offset.
  • The screens are displayed in a LIFO (stack) order. If this behavior is causing your screen to flicker (perhaps you wanted to pop two screens after you are done with the current one) there is a Close() method in the screen interface of all the screen and dialog components that deletes the screen out of the display stack. An example might be coming out of a Registration or Search page to a Springboard screen. From the Springboard screen, you might want to exit to your main screen, not the registration screen or search screen.

 

Example:

10.0 Pre-Certification Checklist

Before your channel can be published to the Roku Channel Store, it must satisfy a set of quality, user interface, and performance criteria.  This set of criteria is listed in the Channel_Checklist_v_1_12.xlsx.  You can help speed the certification process by reviewing these requirements prior to developing your channel and checking that they are satisfied before submission.

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